S.A.D., or the Standard American Diet

Posted on July 12, 2008. Filed under: Antioxidant Blends | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

S.A.D., or the Standard American Diet*, rarely includes the minimum 5-to-9 servings of fresh fruits and vegetables recommended by the National Cancer Institute and the United States Department of Agriculture.  Their concern is primarily about the epidemic rise of cardio-vascular disease, obesity, cancer and premature aging in the populace.  People will only eat what they like and, quite often, what is convenient.  Our goal is to provide good-tasting, instant and healthy super foods that can help bridge the gap between a S.A.D. and an optimal diet.

 

Greens First is our morning antioxidant blend containing 49 super foods, extracts and concentrates, including super greens, vegetables, fruits, probiotics, soluble and insoluble fibers, herbs, spices, natural flavonoids, enzymes and lecithin.  Each 9.4 gram scoop is easily mixed in 6-8 oz. of water, contains only 30 calories and 3 grams of carbohydrates per serving, and is proven to have the antioxidant power of 10 plus servings of fruits and vegetables (see our Greens First Scientific White Paper link below).  Greens First contains Certified Organic fruits and vegetables.  Adding Greens First to your diet may help to boost energy, promote a healthy heart, improve digestion, fight aging, promote normal cholesterol, assist weight management, and more.

Greens First Scientific White Paper:  http://www.greensfirst.com/gestion/GreensFirstWhitePaper.pdf

(* The Standard American Diet, aka S.A.D., tends to be high in animal fats, unhealthy saturated and hydrogenated fats, and processed foods, while being low in fiber, complex carbohydrates and plant-based foods.)

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Green Tea and Fat Oxidation

Posted on July 2, 2008. Filed under: Weight Weight Weight | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

I’m reproducing this article from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and note, especially, the “Conclusions” at the bottom.  Green Tea is not only a treat but a benefit, too.  Enjoy! 

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American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 70, No. 6, 1040-1045, December 1999
© 1999
American Society for Clinical Nutrition


Original Research Communications

Efficacy of a green tea extract rich in catechin polyphenols and caffeine in increasing 24-h energy expenditure and fat oxidation in humans1,2,3

Abdul G Dulloo, Claudette Duret, Dorothée Rohrer, Lucien Girardier, Nouri Mensi, Marc Fathi, Philippe Chantre and Jacques Vandermander

1 From the Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva; Geneva University Hospital; and Laboratoires Arkopharma, Nice, France.

 

Background: Current interest in the role of functional foods in weight control has focused on plant ingredients capable of interfering with the sympathoadrenal system.

Objective: We investigated whether a green tea extract, by virtue of its high content of caffeine and catechin polyphenols, could increase 24-h energy expenditure (EE) and fat oxidation in humans.

Design: Twenty-four–hour EE, the respiratory quotient (RQ), and the urinary excretion of nitrogen and catecholamines were measured in a respiratory chamber in 10 healthy men. On 3 separate occasions, subjects were randomly assigned among 3 treatments: green tea extract (50 mg caffeine and 90 mg epigallocatechin gallate), caffeine (50 mg), and placebo, which they ingested at breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Results: Relative to placebo, treatment with the green tea extract resulted in a significant increase in 24-h EE (4%; P < 0.01) and a significant decrease in 24-h RQ (from 0.88 to 0.85; P < 0.001) without any change in urinary nitrogen. Twenty-four–hour urinary norepinephrine excretion was higher during treatment with the green tea extract than with the placebo (40%, P < 0.05). Treatment with caffeine in amounts equivalent to those found in the green tea extract had no effect on EE and RQ nor on urinary nitrogen or catecholamines.

Conclusions: Green tea has thermogenic properties and promotes fat oxidation beyond that explained by its caffeine content per se. The green tea extract may play a role in the control of body composition via sympathetic activation of thermogenesis, fat oxidation, or both.

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