Antioxidant [super] Blend…Not A One-Note Samba

Posted on July 1, 2008. Filed under: Antioxidant Blends | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Eating or drinking one or two ingredient antioxidant supplements is like having an orchestra with one or two instruments.  It’s not a full complement. 

 Dr. Passwater says the following about antioxidants in his book, “The Antioxidants”:

 “Combinations of antioxidants are like a balanced symphony working together. A symphony orchestra produces sounds so much more harmonious than merely having 20 drums playing. It is not the quantity, but the blend. The same is true with antioxidant nutrients: you get better results with moderate amounts of a full complement than you get with using very large amounts of just one nutrient… In general, the different reducing agents in the body “talk to one another” freely, and thus, it is probably important that all of our pools of reducing agents be maintained. For this reason, most of us in the field recommend that a person take a variety of antioxidants (a “cocktail”), not just a single substance.”

Dr. Passwater concludes: “The importance of synergism is that the antioxidant nutrients each contribute to the total protection. They work together in the antioxidant cycle and reach all body compartments–fat and water-based, blood and internal cell. They protect against all types of free radicals and reactive oxygen species. No one antioxidant can do all of this.”

Our morning blend of antioxidants – GREENS FIRST – is a full complement of start-the-day-right vegetables and fruits in a pleasant tasting blend.  Our afternoon blend of antioxidants – RED ALERT – is a fruit and vegetable mix to give you that bit of a boost in the afternoon you need.  Both blends are a synergistic, phytonutrient-dense, antioxidant-rich complement of certified and organic vegetables and fruit.

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Aging, Antioxidants and Free Radicals

Posted on June 28, 2008. Filed under: Antioxidant Blends, Just FYI | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

  * (See photo comments below)

The free radical theory of aging is generally accepted with more and more health science researchers concluding that free radicals cause oxidation.  It is commonly understood that oxidation is a process akin to the rusting of metal, and causes age-related deteriortation of the heart as well as being a central process of aging.  Human metabolism and energy productions create free radicals.  They are also at times the key feature of pollutants, poisons and drugs.

Our natural antioxidant processes compensate for one another, covering up momentary deficiencies by their overlap. Perhaps our very best result comes from maintaining all of our antioxidation resources to work towards our good health.

Dr. Passwater goes on to say the following about antioxidants in his book The Antioxidants :

“Combinations of antioxidants are like a balanced symphony working together. A symphony orchestra produces sounds so much more harmonious than merely having 20 drums playing. It is not the quantity, but the blend. The same is true with antioxidant nutrients: you get better results with moderate amounts of a full complement than you get with using very large amounts of just one nutrient… In general, the different reducing agents in the body “talk to one another” freely, and thus, it is probably important that all of our pools of reducing agents be maintained. For this reason, most of us in the field recommend that a person take a variety of antioxidants (a “cocktail”), not just a single substance.”

Dr. Passwater concludes:

“The importance of synergism is that the antioxidant nutrients each contribute to the total protection. They work together in the antioxidant cycle and reach all body compartments–fat and water-based, blood and internal cell. They protect against all types of free radicals and reactive oxygen species. No one antioxidant can do all of this.”

 (* Photo comments – 88 year old Grandfather to 11, John Lowe, of Witchford, Cambs, UK, took up dancing having watched his daughter Alison become a professional dancer.  The retired teacher said: “It’s a wonderful thing to do and I can’t understand why more men don’t do it.”  

Mr Lowe appeared with the Lantern Dance Theatre Company, in Ely, UK, on Sunday evening, January 13, 2008.  Mr. Lowe perfected his pirouettes at home in daily practice in preparation for his premier performance in Prokofiev’s “The Stone Flower at The Maltings.”

Mr. Lowe states, “I went to a dance school in the high street in Ely and asked if I could do tap and ballet and they said ‘well of course you can’ and I’ve been doing it ever since.  I’ve got a rope at home that I use to pull my leg up higher. I’m lucky that I don’t have any problem with the routines but that’s because I exercise. There’s nothing effeminate about it – you have to be incredibly fit to dance.”

Now that’s enjoying your golden years, and we applaud John Lowe and aging gracefully!!)

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