Greens First Antioxidant Power

Posted on February 16, 2009. Filed under: Antioxidant Blends, antioxidants, greens | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Greens First provides many of the phytonutrient and antioxidant benefits of a fruit and vegetable-rich diet, especially of vibrantly colored fruits and dark green vegetables. While eating 5 to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables per day is ideal, it may be difficult to accomplish consistently.  Greens First contains 49 super foods, extracts and concentrates including super greens, vegetables, fruits, probiotics, soluble and insoluble fibers, herbs, spices, natural flavonoids, enzymes and lecithin.  Greens First contains 30 calories and 3 grams of carbohydrates per 9.4 gram scoop serving mixed with 6 to 8 oz. of water, and the antioxidant power of 10+ servings of fruit and vegetables via an independent ORAC analysis (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity).*

 Adding Greens First to your diet may help:
•Boost Energy  /  •Promote a Healthy Heart  /  •Improve Digestion  /  •Boost the Immune System  /  •Alkalize and Balance pH  /  •Support Normal Blood Sugar  /  •Fight Aging  /  •Promote Normal Cholesterol  /  •Assist Weight Management  /  •No Sugar Added!  /  •No Wheat, Dairy, MSG, Artificial Sweeteners or Preservatives!

Greens First tastes great alone but can also be mixed with Dream Protein for a yummy “whole food” meal replacement shake.

*Antioxidant value determined via an independent ORAC analysis (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Antioxidant Power of Tea

Posted on August 7, 2008. Filed under: Antioxidant Blends | Tags: , , , , , , |

Do you think water is the most consumed drink in the world? Well, think again! The big winner is tea and it’s well ahead of coffee, beer, wine and carbonated soft drinks.

There are several studies that suggest that black and green tea beverages may have positive health benefits. Black or green teas, but not herbal teas, have antioxidant capabilities due to their flavonoids content. Flavonoids prevent oxidation – are antioxidant in their effect – and they may have an anticlotting effect as well. One study found that among people who’d had heart attacks, those who drank 14 or more cups of tea a week were 44 percent less likely to die in the 3 1/2 years following their heart attacks than those who didn’t drink any tea. In another study people who drank about 1 1/2 cups of tea daily had roughly half the risk of heart attack of those who didn’t drink tea.

Bag it. When Consumer Reports tested the antioxidant power of 15 brewed, bottled, and instant teas, it found most teas brewed from tea bags scored highest in antioxidant content. Consumer Reports stated, “Brewed tea appears to have more antioxidant action than almost any whole fruit or vegetable — and more than most commercial fruit or vegetable juices, too.” But iced teas from mixes and bottle are a decent second choice; they contain a “good deal” of antioxidants, according to the magazine. Just watch the sugar content.

Dunk the bag. Continuously dunking the tea bag as the tea steeps seems to release far more antioxidant compounds than simply dropping it in and leaving it there.

Add lemon. One study found that the addition of lemon to plain tea increased its antioxidant benefits. That makes sense, since lemon itself contains antioxidants.

Brew a batch. To make a day’s supply of iced tea, bring 20 ounces of water to a boil, then remove from the heat. Drop in three tea bags, cover, and steep for 10 minutes. Remove tea bags and refrigerate.

Try green tea. Because it isn’t fermented, green tea has even more antioxidant power than black tea does. It also has less caffeine. And it may provide some protection against certain cancers. Experiment with brands until you find one you like. Don’t let green tea steep for more than a couple of minutes or it may become bitter.

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A Cup of Tea May Protect Against Skin Cancer

Posted on June 10, 2008. Filed under: Antioxidant Blends | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

ScienceDaily (Apr. 30, 1998) — New findings…tea may contribute significant protection against development of skin cancers caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays (presented by the CSIRO Division of Human Nutrition at the inaugural Australian International Symposium on Tea and Health in Sydney)


                                           

(Article):  The latest research with mice found those given tea (with milk) experienced a reduction in the development of skin cancer of 50 per cent and a reduction in the development of papillomas of 70 per cent.

 Tea is a rich source of special antioxidants called flavonoids, considered to be some of the most potent antioxidants in nature. Scientists believe antioxidants in the diet have an important role to play in the fight against diseases including cancer.

 The important new CSIRO study examined the effect of providing tea with 10% milk, (compared to just 10% milk or just water) as the sole drinking fluid on UVA+B induced skin cancer in mice. The key finding was a significant reduction in the development of skin cancers in mice drinking tea with milk.

 “These findings are significant because initially it was thought milk may bind to the flavonoids, and impact on the antioxidant properties and potential health benefits of tea. The most recent findings would suggest that the protective role of the flavonoids is enhanced in the presence of milk,” said Dr Ian Record of CSIRO Division of Human Nutrition.

 “Intensive research is currently underway into tea flavonoids and how they may help protect the body from potentially harmful substances called free radicals. UV rays generate free radicals in the skin, which in turn inflict damage on the skin cells’ – causing some cells to become cancerous,” he added.

 The researchers sounded a note of caution that, so far, the effects of tea as an anti-cancer agent has only been explored in mice, and the implications of their findings for humans will require further investigation.

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