Resveratrol in Red Wine May Achieve Same Longevity Results as Starvation Dieting

Posted on July 31, 2008. Filed under: Antioxidant Blends | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

How do the French get away with a clean bill of heart health despite a diet loaded with saturated fats? Scientists have long suspected that the answer to the so-called “French paradox” lies in red wine.  Researchers from industry and academia, including the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Florida, and the open-access journal Public Library of Science (PLoS) ONE, report that low doses of resveratrol — a natural constituent of grapes, pomegranates, red wine and other foods — can potentially boost the quality of life by improving heart health in old age. A small amount in the diets of middle-aged mice had a widespread influence on the genetic causes of aging. Specifically, the low dose of resveratrol mimicked the heart-healthy effects of what is known as caloric restriction, diets with 20 to 30 percent fewer calories than a typical diet. The new study is important because it suggests that resveratrol and caloric restriction may govern the same master genetic pathways related to aging. The similarities were remarkable. The new study showed that resveratrol in low doses, beginning in middle age, could elicit many of the same benefits as a reduced-calorie diet. The authors noted that a glass of wine or food or supplements containing even small doses of resveratrol were likely to help stave off cardiac aging.

In the heart, for example, there are at least 1,029 genes whose functions change with age. In animals on restricted diets, 90 percent of those heart genes experienced alterations in gene expression, while low doses of resveratrol thwarted age-related change in 92 percent. The new findings, said the study’s authors, revealed how red wine’s special ingredient helped keep the heart young and stave off cardiac aging. Mitochondria, which are everywhere as the tiny power plants that keep a cell functioning, were affected by resveratrol which seemed to promote mitochondrial health and reduce the cells vulnerability to the oxidative damage that accumulates during the aging process. Viva resveratrol and pass the bottle!

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Dr. Robert Young, “Greens” & the Alkalizing Diet

Posted on July 23, 2008. Filed under: Antioxidant Blends | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

GREENS FIRST contains only 30 calories and 3 grams of carbohydrates per serving; mixes easily without a blender; contains 49 super foods, extracts and concentrates including super greens, vegetables, fruits, probiotics, soluble and insoluble fibers, herbs, spices, natural flavonoids, enzymes and lecithin; each 9.4 gram scoop mixed with 6 to 8 oz. of water is proven to have the antioxidant power of 10 plus servings of fruit and vegetables;* contains Certified Organic Fruits and Vegetables.

                   

ALKA-FIZZ is not a medicine to cure any disease. There is no approved therapeutic claim, but it will add bicarbonates [HCO3] to the blood stream. Bicarbonates in the blood stream are one of the primary substances for life and basic elements of nutrition that keep your blood alkaline and available to neutralize acids.*   The decline of bicarbonates in the blood with a corresponding increase of acids and a lowering of the arterial pH may promote aging and chronic conditions.  Some may say that the reduction of bicarbonates is an unavoidable result of aging. However others suggest that the reduction of bicarbonates is the primary cause of physiological aging and by adding bicarbonates we may delay the aging process and prevent age related adult degenerative conditions.  For more information, read the following:  http://www.greensfirst.com/5039/gf_content2.asp?node=83

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S.A.D., or the Standard American Diet

Posted on July 12, 2008. Filed under: Antioxidant Blends | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

S.A.D., or the Standard American Diet*, rarely includes the minimum 5-to-9 servings of fresh fruits and vegetables recommended by the National Cancer Institute and the United States Department of Agriculture.  Their concern is primarily about the epidemic rise of cardio-vascular disease, obesity, cancer and premature aging in the populace.  People will only eat what they like and, quite often, what is convenient.  Our goal is to provide good-tasting, instant and healthy super foods that can help bridge the gap between a S.A.D. and an optimal diet.

 

Greens First is our morning antioxidant blend containing 49 super foods, extracts and concentrates, including super greens, vegetables, fruits, probiotics, soluble and insoluble fibers, herbs, spices, natural flavonoids, enzymes and lecithin.  Each 9.4 gram scoop is easily mixed in 6-8 oz. of water, contains only 30 calories and 3 grams of carbohydrates per serving, and is proven to have the antioxidant power of 10 plus servings of fruits and vegetables (see our Greens First Scientific White Paper link below).  Greens First contains Certified Organic fruits and vegetables.  Adding Greens First to your diet may help to boost energy, promote a healthy heart, improve digestion, fight aging, promote normal cholesterol, assist weight management, and more.

Greens First Scientific White Paper:  http://www.greensfirst.com/gestion/GreensFirstWhitePaper.pdf

(* The Standard American Diet, aka S.A.D., tends to be high in animal fats, unhealthy saturated and hydrogenated fats, and processed foods, while being low in fiber, complex carbohydrates and plant-based foods.)

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Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC)

Posted on July 7, 2008. Filed under: Antioxidant Blends | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The method for measuring the antioxidant capacity of various foods is called ORAC which is the acronym for Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity.  ORAC was developed by scientists in the NIH, specifically in the National Institute on Aging division (but the method is not approved by the NIH).

A wide variety of foods had been test for their ORAC values in the past, but the following chart is more current and reflects the 2007 results.  The importance of a food’s high ORAC value is that it indicates a food’s antioxidant value, and a high value is believed to be correlated in the Free-radical theory of aging. 

This more current list from 2007 was compiled by scientists within the United States Dept. of Agriculture and includes ORAC values for 277 foods commonly consumed in the USA (grains, seeds, nuts, spices, vegetables, fruits, etc.).  It’s also considered to be more accurate than the previously published ORAC numbers because it shows that all plants have variable amounts of both hydrophilic (water-loving) phytochemicals and lipophilic (fat-loving) phytochemicals that contribute to total ORAC. 

USDA data on foods with high levels of antioxidant phytochemicals

Food

Serving size

Antioxidant capacity per serving size[6]

Cinnamon, ground

100 grams

267,536

Aronia black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa)

100 grams

16062

Small Red Bean

½ cup dried beans

13727

Wild blueberry

1 cup

13427

Red kidney bean

½ cup dried beans

13259

Pinto bean

½ cup

11864

Blueberry

1 cup (cultivated berries)

9019

Cranberry

1 cup (whole berries)

8983

Artichoke hearts

1 cup, cooked

7904

Blackberry

1 cup (cultivated berries)

7701

Prune

½ cup

7291

Raspberry

1 cup

6058

Strawberry

1 cup

5938

Red Delicious apple

1 apple

5900

Granny Smith apple

1 apple

5381

Pecan

oz

5095

Sweet cherry

1 cup

4873

Black plum

1 plum

4844

Russet potato

1, cooked

4649

Black bean

½ cup dried beans

4181

Plum

1 plum

4118

Gala apple

1 apple

3903

 

 

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Aging, Antioxidants and Free Radicals

Posted on June 28, 2008. Filed under: Antioxidant Blends, Just FYI | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

  * (See photo comments below)

The free radical theory of aging is generally accepted with more and more health science researchers concluding that free radicals cause oxidation.  It is commonly understood that oxidation is a process akin to the rusting of metal, and causes age-related deteriortation of the heart as well as being a central process of aging.  Human metabolism and energy productions create free radicals.  They are also at times the key feature of pollutants, poisons and drugs.

Our natural antioxidant processes compensate for one another, covering up momentary deficiencies by their overlap. Perhaps our very best result comes from maintaining all of our antioxidation resources to work towards our good health.

Dr. Passwater goes on to say the following about antioxidants in his book The Antioxidants :

“Combinations of antioxidants are like a balanced symphony working together. A symphony orchestra produces sounds so much more harmonious than merely having 20 drums playing. It is not the quantity, but the blend. The same is true with antioxidant nutrients: you get better results with moderate amounts of a full complement than you get with using very large amounts of just one nutrient… In general, the different reducing agents in the body “talk to one another” freely, and thus, it is probably important that all of our pools of reducing agents be maintained. For this reason, most of us in the field recommend that a person take a variety of antioxidants (a “cocktail”), not just a single substance.”

Dr. Passwater concludes:

“The importance of synergism is that the antioxidant nutrients each contribute to the total protection. They work together in the antioxidant cycle and reach all body compartments–fat and water-based, blood and internal cell. They protect against all types of free radicals and reactive oxygen species. No one antioxidant can do all of this.”

 (* Photo comments – 88 year old Grandfather to 11, John Lowe, of Witchford, Cambs, UK, took up dancing having watched his daughter Alison become a professional dancer.  The retired teacher said: “It’s a wonderful thing to do and I can’t understand why more men don’t do it.”  

Mr Lowe appeared with the Lantern Dance Theatre Company, in Ely, UK, on Sunday evening, January 13, 2008.  Mr. Lowe perfected his pirouettes at home in daily practice in preparation for his premier performance in Prokofiev’s “The Stone Flower at The Maltings.”

Mr. Lowe states, “I went to a dance school in the high street in Ely and asked if I could do tap and ballet and they said ‘well of course you can’ and I’ve been doing it ever since.  I’ve got a rope at home that I use to pull my leg up higher. I’m lucky that I don’t have any problem with the routines but that’s because I exercise. There’s nothing effeminate about it – you have to be incredibly fit to dance.”

Now that’s enjoying your golden years, and we applaud John Lowe and aging gracefully!!)

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Free Radicals Are Unpaired Electrons

Posted on June 11, 2008. Filed under: Antioxidant Blends | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

    

 

Free radicals are unpaired electrons which, in your body, attack healthy cells so they can acquire the healthy cell’s electrons.  The healthy cells then become free radicals as well.  This multiplication of free radicals can lead to aging, cancer, heart disease, and other degenerative problems.  Ingestion of antioxidants, or foods rich in antioxidants, allows them to donate their electrons to damaged cells.  This slows down or can prevent  degenerative changes in the body.  Eating especially intensely colored fruits and vegetables is a great way to get adequate antioxidants into your body.  Organic phytonutrient-rich antioxidant supplements is also a good choice.  Berries are particularly rich in antioxidants with raspberries, blueberries and strawberries being some of your great choices.  So is the Acai berry, and brightly colored vegetables. 

 

http://greensfirst.com/5039/gf_content2.asp?node=87 

 

 http://greensfirst.com/5039/gf_content2.asp?node=15

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How Do Birds and Berries Depend On Each Other?

Posted on June 4, 2008. Filed under: Antioxidant Blends | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

blueberry

 

For their cycle of life.  Birds eat the yummy berry fruits – blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, and more – then fly hither and yon spreading the berry seeds.  The berry seeds have more places to grow and spread, and the cycle repeats.  Phytonutrients are the phytochemicals that give berries their attractive and lively colors.  These highly visible colors attract the seed-distributing birds that feast on the fruit and spread the wealth.

 

Berries, in general, contain vitamins (Vitamins C & E are common), minerals (Manganese and Niacin, too), and fiber (4-9 grams per cup) plus a burst of succulent flavor in every bite.  These fun-to-eat foods may help prevent heart disease and cancer, boost the immune system, have antiviral and antibacterial properties, and slow the aging process.  These healthful benefits are due to the concentration of phytonutrients which have an antioxidant effect (kind of like anti-rust).  Besides the deeply colored berries, strongly colored vegetables, nuts, flax seeds, tea and dark chocolate also tend to be high in the healthful phytochemicals. 

 

Would you rather get your daily dose of phytonutrients and antioxidants from your cup of tea, carrots and broccoli, dark chocolate, or brightly colored berries?

 

“Mac”

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